22/10/2017

I’ve written (in a rather rambling way) about my memories of Bristol, and finding a lost dog. https://d.pr/IOffsB

posts
15/10/2017

Arrival, 2016 - ★★★★½

I’ve realised that I definitely prefer my sci-fi films to leave a good portion of the explanation to my imagination. Arrival delivered on that, and I loved it. The visuals, the look of the aliens and their method of communication, the non-linear aspect of the plot and the music were all perfectly suited to the story. I liked the message too, though at the moment I have less confidence that we - as a species - would be able to pull together internationally to collaborate in the way that is shown here. I hope I’m wrong.

All the leads were great in this, but Amy Adams particularly gave a very strong performance. This is one of those films that I’m tempted to watch again, just to pick up the subtleties.

Read full review on Letterboxd

films
15/10/2017

The Young Offenders, 2016 - ★★★★★

After a difficult week, this gleefully rackety film was just the ticket. Two young Cork lads (Conor and Jock) - who are not overly burdened by common sense - hatch a plan to steal bikes and cycle 160 km to the tip of Cork to try to find a missing bale of cocaine from a smuggler’s shipwreck, thereby making their fortune.

What they lack in brains, they make up for in chutzpah and a rather touching bond of friendship. Their road trip is full of physical and verbal comedy, but there’s also a darker, sadder element to balance it out, as both boys have dysfunctional families.

The lads speak so fast that it takes a few minutes to adjust to the Cork accent, but from then on their chat is a treat. The music is wonderful too, and you’ll end up with a persistent Sultans of Ping earworm by the end.

Read full review on Letterboxd

films
1/10/2017

The Lunchbox, 2013 - ★★★★★

A lovely, tender, epistolary romance between a neglected young wife and a widower who is about to retire. The daily lunchboxes, lovingly prepared by Ila for her husband, get mistakenly delivered by Mumbai’s dabbawalas to Saajan. He can’t believe his luck as he - as a widower - usually gets his lunchboxes prepared by a rather indifferent commercial service. He starts returning the boxes with little notes, and before long he and Ila are revealing their deepest secrets to one another.

It’s a gentle film, but never saccharine or unrealistic (except, perhaps, for the mis-delivery, which a dabbawala in the film assures Ila can never happen, because people from Harvard did a study…). There’s a lightness of touch, and elements that might be handled more heavy-handedly (like the fact that Saajan is evidently a Christian), are just left for the viewer to note - literally in the background. The city and commuting scenes are really evocative of Mumbai, and for non-Indian viewers it provides a rare glimpse into the lives of ordinary middle-class people.

Read full review on Letterboxd

films
1/10/2017

Bobowler by Liz Berry

I heard this on the radio the other morning, and was transfixed. I love Liz Berry’s poetry. It’s full of the beauty of Black Country dialect words (like bobowler’ — a word for a large moth), and it grabs you by the heart when you least expect it. Even better is if you hear Liz herself read her poems, in her soft, warm voice.

link poetry
1/10/2017

View from Brandon Hill Park, BristolView from Brandon Hill Park, Bristol

Such a great view from up here. One of my favourite spots in Bristol.

images