19/11/2017

I’m enjoying Forklift 3 (a Finder replacement), and have written a quick review: https://d.pr/wVu96l

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19/11/2017

Wonder Woman, 2017 - ★★★★★

I don’t care that it wasn’t perfect, and that it was a bit creaky in places (particularly in the CGI). I loved it unconditionally because it portrayed strong women so beautifully.

I love the way that they used actors who were also athletes or martial artists as the Amazons in the opening scenes. They all looked so tough, fast, graceful, capable and strong that I totally bought the brief bits of flying through the air and shooting three arrows at once. Gal Gadot is so perfect as Diana/Wonder Woman, and in my opinion, the whole film is worth it just for that scene in no-man’s land. That power pose that we never get to see women doing in films, the way she was just resisting with strength and power and determination, well, that brought quite a lump to my throat.

The light-hearted scenes were done well, particularly when she was trying to find an outfit with Etta (I could have seen a lot more of Etta - she was great), and the interaction between Diana and Steve was good and believable. I can’t wait for the next one…

Read full review on Letterboxd

films
19/11/2017

The Other Boleyn Girl, 2008 - ★★★

This was an enjoyable enough watch, but having read other Philippa Gregory books (though not the one on which this film is based), I can’t help feeling that the film didn’t really do it justice. I have however read both Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, so I’m aware that there was a lot more complexity and politics going on than we see here, even if Gregory’s book is perhaps rather more loosely based on the historical facts.

It feels far too brief and superficial, and we never really get a feel for the character’s motivations. William Stafford, for example makes only the briefest appearances during most of the film, then suddenly appears happily married to Mary right at the end. The time between Anne first being courted by Henry to her execution feels rushed and glossed over. I think all the leads did the best that they could with the script (though I didn’t buy Eric Bana as King Henry - where was the red hair?), but what they were given wasn’t quite good enough.

As I said, I enjoyed it well enough despite that, partly because I was distracted by the glorious fabrics on show, and the width of Henry’s shoulders in his puffy sleeves. I swear he had to turn sideways to get through some of the doorways. His style of dress is historically accurate if you look at the portraits of the King at that time, but I guess it hadn’t struck me before how physically imposing and dominating it is, which I’m sure was the whole point.

Read full review on Letterboxd

films
5/11/2017

The Duchess, 2008 - ★★★★

The lush, sad and beautifully-told true story of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire.

Georgiana was clearly an intelligent, lively, and ambitious women, trapped by the role expected of her at the time. That role can be boiled down to produce sons’: that was pretty much it. Somehow out of that she managed eventually to retain some control and an element of doing things on her own terms, but I can’t help thinking how much happier she might have been being born two centuries later.

Read full review on Letterboxd

films
5/11/2017

Spy, 2015 - ★★★

Ridiculous but fun. The spotlight on sexism and sizeism was mostly (but not always) spot on. While much of the plot was completely unbelievable, the central premise - that an overlooked woman would make a perfect spy because she is essentially invisible - was logical. In fact, why aren’t all spies (say) post-menopausal women?

Jason Statham annoyed the heck out of me, but Miranda Hart was as adorable as ever, Peter Serafinowicz was hilarious, and I enjoyed the scenes between both of them and Melissa.

Read full review on Letterboxd

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22/10/2017

I’ve written (in a rather rambling way) about my memories of Bristol, and finding a lost dog. https://d.pr/IOffsB

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